OpenSite

Free Sports Management Courses

Explore our catalog of 24 Sports Management open education resources. Randomize your content or view a certain media type by using the filter menu. Favorite any resource to return to later or find a school where you can study.

School Finder

Start here to find your school

Beyond The Playing Field: Sport Psychology Meets Embodied Cognition

Beyond The Playing Field: Sport Psychology Meets Embodied Cognition

Bowling

Bowling

Clinical Sports Medicine Update - Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Postoperative Care and Rehabilitation: Science and Practice

Clinical Sports Medicine Update - Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Postoperative Care and Rehabilitation: Science and Practice

Discovering Inconspicuous Exploitation: Applying The Theories of W. E. B. Dubois to American Sports Sociology

Discovering Inconspicuous Exploitation: Applying The Theories of W. E. B. Dubois to American Sports Sociology

Doing Sport Psychology: Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing in Professional Soccer.

Doing Sport Psychology: Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing in Professional Soccer.

Exploring sport online: Athletes and efficient hearts

Exploring sport online: Athletes and efficient hearts

Football Economics

Football Economics

Funding elite sport

Funding elite sport

Intermediate Swimming

Intermediate Swimming

The Exercise Addiction Inventory: A Quick and Easy Screening Tool for Health Practitioners.

The Exercise Addiction Inventory: A Quick and Easy Screening Tool for Health Practitioners.

The psychological aspects of sports injury

The psychological aspects of sports injury

UniSA Graduate working at Adelaide United Football Club - University of South Australia

UniSA Graduate working at Adelaide United Football Club - University of South Australia

What is a sport?

A sport is a game, played as a recreational activity or professionally as employment. It is usually played for enjoyment, but it always involves some form of competition and usually improves the health and fitness of participants.

Sports usually require physical skill, as opposed to many other games which require luck or mental skill. Many sports are considered to grow character and life skills, although the environment that sport takes place in is very different from that of normal life.

Participating and spectating sports have continued to be popular in almost all cultures at almost all points of recent history, although the sports in question have been different and have reflected the attitudes and characteristics of society at the time.

Why are sports useful for survival?

Many sports use the skills humans first developed as survival skills. These sports may actually simulate survival situations, but the essential difference is that sports are ultimately recreational and any competition is not for survival but rather for enjoyment.

Examples include:

  • target sports, which use skills that were originally for hunting food.
  • yachting/cycling/motorised sports/etc., which are forms of transport undertaken as sports.
  • combat sports, which developed as forms of defence.
  • weightlifting, which involves heavy objects solely for the purposes of muscle development.