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Free Homeland Security Courses

Explore our catalog of 114 Homeland Security open education resources. Randomize your content or view a certain media type by using the filter menu. Favorite any resource to return to later or find a school where you can study.

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A Computer-Based System to Support Forensic Studies On Handwritten Documents

A Computer-Based System to Support Forensic Studies On Handwritten Documents

A Conversation with Carl M. Levin (Video)

A Conversation with Carl M. Levin (Video)

A Conversation with General James F. Amos (Video)

A Conversation with General James F. Amos (Video)

A Conversation with Hoshyar Zebari (Video)

A Conversation with Hoshyar Zebari (Video)

A Conversation with Lindsey O. Graham (Video)

A Conversation with Lindsey O. Graham (Video)

A Conversation with Pervez Musharraf (Video)

A Conversation with Pervez Musharraf (Video)

A Conversation with Philip Zelikow (Video)

A Conversation with Philip Zelikow (Video)

A Curious Reconstruction? The Shaping of Marketized Forensic Science

A Curious Reconstruction? The Shaping of Marketized Forensic Science

Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Liberia

Addressing Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in Liberia

Autonomic Forensics A New Frontier to Computer Crime Investigation Management

Autonomic Forensics A New Frontier to Computer Crime Investigation Management

Case Study in Iranian Criminal System

Case Study in Iranian Criminal System

Children and violence: An introductory, international and interdisciplinary approach

Children and violence: An introductory, international and interdisciplinary approach

Community Policing, Homeland Security and Terrorism

Community Policing, Homeland Security and Terrorism

Contagion Screening and Discussion (Video)

Contagion Screening and Discussion (Video)

Council on Foreign Relations/Foreign Affairs Back-to-School Event (Video)

Council on Foreign Relations/Foreign Affairs Back-to-School Event (Video)

Crisis Response in War and Peace: Russia's Emergencies Ministry and Security Sector Reform

Crisis Response in War and Peace: Russia's Emergencies Ministry and Security Sector Reform

Critical Theory and The Language of Violence: Exploring The Issues

Critical Theory and The Language of Violence: Exploring The Issues

Defining the Boundaries: Homeland Security and Its Impact on Scientific Research

Defining the Boundaries: Homeland Security and Its Impact on Scientific Research

Does prison work?

Does prison work?

Drugs, Politics, and Culture

What is a home? →

The term 'home' can be used in various contexts. It usually refers to where you choose to live, any surrounding gardens or outdoor space around your home and the things you do in a home, such as homemaking, gardening and cooking. It also refers to the people living within a home, especially a family.

What is a house? →

A house is a human-made structure intended to be a dwelling for one or more people. It is usually made from a strong and durable material, such as wood or concrete. The main purpose of a house is to provide shelter from heat, cold, wind and rain and protection from animals and other humans.

When a house is occupied by one or more people, it is known as a home. Those occupying a home will usually spend time away from home, especially during daylight hours, to work or to pursue recreational and other activities. They will usually spend time at home, especially during night, eating and sleeping.

The first houses were caves of prehistoric times and construction methods have developed continuously over time. Some of the first European houses were simple huts. Today, the construction of houses usually consists of building a wooden frame in a method known as light-frame construction. In areas where there is less wood, mud or clay may be used instead. There are a variety of different types of houses and the availability of housing is a concern.

What is home economics? →

Home economics is a the study of tasks involved in the management of a household, including the homemaking tasks of cooking, cleaning, home improvement, parenting, gardening and shopping.

The formal name for home economics is now family and consumer sciences. Ironically, the people with the most skill in the area have usually not been formally trained, but have instead learned the skills at home.

For a long time the study of home economics was reserved for women, as they were seen as being responsible for household tasks around the home. Women have been and continue to be seen as having more homemaking skills, and until recently the curriculum of many girls' schools was dominated by home economics subjects.